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Miyoko’s Creamery Is Helping Dairy Farmers Go Vegan!

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Miyoko’s Creamery has joined forces with Farm Sanctuary to help California dairy farms transition to producing plant based cheeses and butters.

Miyoko Schinner began producing plant based dairy products in 2014 to critical and commercial success. Her ever growing library of plant cheeses come from cashews sourced in Vietnam but she wants to change that with the help of U.S. Farmers and Farm Sanctuary.

The companies new line of cheeses are made from potatoes and legumes from right here in the U.S. Schinner wants to partner with farmers to grow and produce her new line. She told “The Dairyreporter” That she noticed many dairy farms were collapsing or choosing to close down before they collapsed and she owns a dairy cow from a recently shuttered dairy farm in California and wants to help.

This past January (2019) she spoke with International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA) emphasizing that farmers switching to plant based agriculture from animal agriculture is how dairy farmers can “become part of the solution for a sustainable future.”

Several dairy’s have already switched to all vegan products including the large Elmhurst dairy back in 2017 who nearly overnight went from bovine mammary secretions to plant based milks successfully and continues to do so to this day.

Gene Baur founder of Farm Sanctuary told “Dairy Reporter”: “We share Miyoko’s vision for a compassionate food system and are looking forward to working with them to help farmers become part of a cruelty free, more sustainable, plant based future.”

Miyoko’s will compensate any new farmers in the agreement during their research for new plant based products and will become a source in the brands ever growing supply chain. It’s a win win opportunity for both sides and is the best way to transition a dying industry.

“We think it’s the responsibility of industry to provide solutions for hard working people. So yes, there are farmers that are doing it on their own. But we need them and hopefully they need us.” Schinner said

“They’re good people. They’re hardworking and they believe in what they are doing. But the economy is changing that’s the reality, and it’s going to continue changing.”

According to the USDA 2,500 dairies went out of business in 2018 and the number of dairy cows decreased by more than 100,000. Amidst low milk prices, declining consumption, cruelty investigations and the public waking up to the ethical and moral concerns of animal agriculture the industry is fighting a losing a battle.

In the end dairy farmers and others in animal ag can evolve or die off like many other industries through out history.

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Brandon Kirkwood

Animal Rights Activist (ARA), Vegan, Creator and editor of Vegan News, Father to an awesome cat named Boba, Youtuber

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